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104

Pomegranates, muscle mass and healthy aging

Anurag Singh: Chief Medical Officer, Amazentis

Frailty and a decline in overall physical strength are irksome signs of aging. Regular exercise is essential to maintain optimum muscle mass and movement, but are there other interventions that could curb age-related muscle weakening?  A Swiss biotech startup is developing a supplement that could slow down the process, by replacing damaged mitochondria, the parts of cells that generate energy. It turns out that a key component could be a chemical produced by the gut microbiome, when we eat pomegranates and strawberries.  In this LLAMA podcast with Peter Bowes, Dr. Anurag Singh, Chief Medical Officer with Amazentis, explains the background to this developing science and its potential to help older people maintain an independent lifestyle for longer.

Published on: 23 Oct 2019 @ 19:56 PT


NOTES & QUOTES


Connect with Dr. Singh and Amazentis: Company website | About Urolithin A | LinkedIn | Twitter
In this interview we cover:

  • Research at Amazentis and company mission
  • Dr. Singh’s transition from medical practice to medical research
  • The role of mitochondria – the cellular powerhouses – and link to muscle dysfunction or decline
  • Analysing the mitochondrial health of frail vs older, active adults.
  • The connection between pomegranates, strawberries and nuts – and mitochondrial health.
  • The role of Urolithin A and why it could be a valuable dietary supplement.
 Frailty is really the end – the absolute end of the aging spectrum.
  • Why microbiome health is linked to muscle strength.
  • Why optimal diet is not equal to optimal health.
  • The role of mitophagy.
  • Animal studies suggesting urolithin A supplementation promotes enhanced endurance and better mitochondrial function.
  • What the first clinical studies with older, minimally active human subjects show.
  • The current fascination with longevity research and desire to function better for longer.

Functionality and the health span is more important than just lifespan.

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